Conditions such as dry skin, hand eczema, athlete’s foot, insect bites, and seborrheic eczema can be initially treated at pharmacies. However, when it comes to acne, the medication prescribed by a dermatologist will heal much faster, so we will guide you to a nearby dermatologist if you are suffering from acne. Cosmetics that can be sold at pharmacies that are good for acne are only to the extent that they are face washes and basic disinfectants, and they are more for people who want to use them to prevent acne rather than for people who have problems with acne.

Causes

The skin protects itself from various external stimuli, but skin problems can develop due to loss of oil from detergents, contact with allergic substances, and physical friction. People with dry or atopic skin are more prone to skin problems because of their weakened skin barrier function.

Symptoms

Itchy skin, redness, and fine boils. If there are pus-filled blisters or sores, seek medical attention from a dermatologist.

Hand eczema (rough hands) is more common in people who work with cleaning, and as it progresses, cracking and stinging pains appear.

Moisturizers and Topicals

Most of the typical moisturizers and topical products used to relieve skin symptoms can be purchased without a prescription. A prescription is required for Protopic Ointment and Colectim Ointment, which are used for severe atopic conditions. Since the absorption rate of topical steroids varies depending on the area. There are two types of topical steroids: the ointment type, which is less irritating, and the cream type, which is more comfortable to use.

Heparin analog ointment/cream
(Brand name: Hirudoid)

Dosage and Administration

Several times a day ※To improve dry skin, the longer the moisturizer remains on the skin, the better, so reapply frequently if symptoms are severe.

Description

When it comes to dermatological prescriptions for dry skin, Hirudoid is the most common. There are a wide variety of formulations available, including lotions, ointments, creams, sprays, and foams, and they can be used according to the symptoms. The heparin analogue itself has the ability to retain water and bring moisture to dry skin. It is also used for other small wounds that have become red. When used as wound care, use it slowly for 4 weeks and wait for the skin to turn over.

Urea cream 10%, 20%
(Brand name: Urepar, etc.)

Dosage and Administration

Two to three times a day 

Description

It is used for thickened keratin on the heels of feet, elbows and knees. You can buy it at the drugstore or online. It is irritating and should not be applied to the thin skin of the face. The main areas to apply are heels, ankles, fingers, and knees. It is easy to mistake it for a moisturizer, but be careful not to over-exfoliate, as it will instead make your skin less exfoliated and less moisturized.

Acyclovir Ointment
(Brand name: Zovirax Ointment)

Dosage and Administration

Apply several times a day. If the effect is not sufficient after one week, consult a doctor.

Description

It is often prescribed to people who have ever had herpes labialis. There are many people who have been taking care of it because it often recurs. It is sold at drugstores as “Activia Ointment 2G”, but you need a pharmacist to buy it. It is applied to the lips when they are tingling or prickling.

Various types of topical steroids

We suggest various types of topical steroids to our patients after listening to their individual needs. The reason for this is that there are many different types of steroids that can be used depending on the strength of the steroid, the absorption rate of the skin where it is used, and the frequency of use. If a dermatologist’s diagnosis is deemed necessary, we will recommend a consultation.

Brand NameStrengthTrunk/extremities Face/neck/underarms, etc.
Delmorbate ointmentstrongestUp to 4 weeksUp to 2 weeks
Antebate ointmentvery strongUp to 6 weeksUp to 3 weeks
Rinderon DP ointmentvery strongUp to 6 weeksUp to 3 weeks
Nerizona ointmentvery strongUp to 6 weeksUp to 3 weeks
Rinderon V ointmentstrongUp to 8 weeksUp to 4 weeks
Boara ointmentstrongUp to 8 weeksUp to 4 weeks
Ridomex ointmentmild
Kindabate ointmentmild
Locoid ointmentmild
※We also stock various generic drugs.
Dosage and Administration

1~2 times a day Please check each time as the period of safe use varies depending on the strength and location.

Various Antifungal Medicines (Athlete’s Foot Medicines)

Athlete’s foot is a disease that tends to be talked about from before the rainy season until autumn. In Japan’s hot and humid climate, the feet of businessmen who wear shoes all the time become the perfect breeding ground for athlete’s foot. Athlete’s foot is an infectious disease called tinea pedis, which is caused by a fungus called dermatophytes. Athlete’s foot is classified into three categories: the vesicular (sweat blister) type, which causes small blisters on the soles of the feet that peel off when the blisters break, the interdigital type, which causes the skin between the toes to peel off or turn white and puffy, and the hyperkeratotic type, which causes the entire sole of the foot to become hard like a crack or crick. The symptoms of the typical vesicular and interdigital types fluctuate seasonally, being at their peak during the hot and humid season, and easing off in the fall and winter. If left too untreated, ringworm can get into the nails, and the treatment period can be prolonged.

First, the antifungal drugs used for athlete’s foot can be categorized into three major types (plus two chemicals). These are the imidazole, XX amine, and morpholine types. For athlete’s foot treatment, the imidazole-based Lulicon, the allylamine-based Lamisil, and the morpholine-based Pekiron are often used. If the athlete’s foot ointment given at the hospital, pharmacy, or drugstore is not effective, other strains of medication may work well. However, the treatment of athlete’s foot is a long term process, and the application should not be localized, but spread over the entire foot.

If you find that the athlete’s foot treatment you received before took too much time, you may want to consider a different strain. Note that among the ointments commonly used for athlete’s foot, only Crenafin is an ointment that can only be provided with a prescription.

Lulicon (luliconazole)

Structural formula classification: Imidazole system

Classification: Non-prescription ethical drugs (available by prescription or at pharmacies)

Alternative medicine: Lamisil (available at drugstores), Pekiron (available at drugstores under the name Damarin Ace)

Comment: It is an improved version of Astat. If you look closely, you can see that the structural formula is almost the same, and by adding Cl, only the optically active form (R form) can be synthesized. It has better therapeutic results than other athlete’s foot medicines. Originally derived from research on insecticides and pesticides, Astat and Lulicon were created.

Atolant (neticonazole)

Structural formula classification: Imidazole system

Classification: Non-prescription ethical drugs (available by prescription or at pharmacies)

Alternative medicine: Drugstore → Lamisil (available at drugstores), Pekiron (available at drugstores under the name Damarin Ace)

Comment: It was previously sold to the general public under the name Atolant Ace. I am not sure why it was stopped selling.

Astat (lanoconazole)

Structural formula classification: Imidazole system

Classification: OTC drugs (available at drugstores under the name Piroace Z)

Alternative medicine: Lamisil (available at drugstores), Pekiron (available at drugstores under the name Damarin Ace)

Comment: As with Lulicon, this drug was created as a result of research into agricultural chemicals.

Nizoral (ketoconazole)

Structural formula classification: Imidazole system

Classification: Non-prescription ethical drugs (available by prescription or at pharmacies)

Alternative medicine: Lamisil (available at drugstores), Pekiron (available at drugstores under the name Damarin Ace)

Comment: It is used for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis rather than the treatment of ringworm. It is recommended to use the lotion twice a day when using it for seborrheic dermatitis (dandruff) because the concentration of the product does not work when mixed with shampoo.

Mycospor (bifonazole)

Structural formula classification: Imidazole system

Classification: OTC drugs (available at drugstores under the name Bifona Ace)

Alternative medicine: Lamisil (available at drugstores), Pekiron (available at drugstores under the name Damarin Ace)

Comment: The first once-daily antifungal drug to be developed.

Lamisil (terbinafine)

Structural formula classification: Allylamine system

Classification: OTC drugs (available at drugstores under the name Lamisil)

Alternative medicine: Lulicon, Pekiron, Atolant, Astat

Comment: Easily available at drugstores.

Volley (Butenafin)

Structural formula classification: Benzylamine system

Classification: OTC drugs (available at drugstores under the name Butenaloc)

Alternative medicine: Lulicon, Pekiron, Atolant, Astat

Comment: Easily available at drugstores. Lamisil and Volley are in the same family, so if one of them doesn’t work very well, it is better to switch to another family. Note that they are not indicated for Candida.

Pekiron (amorolfine)

Structural formula classification: Morpholine system

Classification: OTC drugs (available at drugstores under the name Damarin Ace)

Alternative medicine: Lulicon, Atolant, Astat, Lamisil, Volley

Comment: Available at drugstores. The only morpholine-based antifungal drug is Pekiron.

Zefnart (liranaftate)

Structural formula classification: Thiocarbamate

Classification: Non-prescription ethical drugs (available by prescription or at pharmacies)

Alternative medicine: Lulicon, Atolant, Astat, Lamisil, Volley, Pekiron

Comment: It is only available by prescription or BPC, but it is not a priority for consideration because it is not indicated for candida and tinea versicolor, and its therapeutic results are not particularly superior to alternatives.